The 2015-2016 excavation campaign - Mont'e Prama

The 2015-2016
excavation campaign
A new excavation campaign under the direction of Alessandro Usai was carried out from May 2015 to December 2016. This campaign, which ended in December 2016, achieved its first goal, which was to recover and reopen the entire long trench opened between 1975 and 1979. Hence excavation was once more concentrated on the necropolis, to the south of the portions already investigated by Bedini and Tronchetti.
Eight tombs were unearthed, covered with square slabs and further to the east, a further eight tombs set in three irregular rows, of simple well type, covered by a heap of stones, destined for the single burial of individuals in a crouched position.
Half of which belonging to an intermediate type with well partially constructed of stone and with covering slabs of various shapes. Current research is focused not on finding more sculptures, but on extending the excavation area to gain more insight on the layout of the area, the relationship between the sculptures and the necropolis and whether a temple or sanctuary once stood there, as well as other structures or buildings having other functions.

The 2015-2016 excavation campaign

In May 2015, the Superintendence launched a new excavation campaign led by Alessandro Usai.
The campaign, which ended in December 2016, allowed the recovery and restoration of the entire long trench opened between 1975 and 1979, which had been backfilled in the 1980s with topsoil, and the connection of the old trench with the 2014 trench.

The excavations of the necropolis also made it possible to identify at least another 22 new tombs, half of which belonged to an intermediate type with a well partially built in stone and with a covering slab of various shapes.

Aerial view of the archaeological area on 28 May 2015
The archaeological area on 12 October 2015

Once again, however, no clues were found to clarify the original arrangement of the sculptures.

Current research is focused not on finding more sculptures, but on extending the excavation area to gain more insight on the layout of the area, the relationship between the sculptures and the necropolis and whether a temple or sanctuary once stood there, as well as other structures or buildings having other functions.